Black Marlin

(Makaira indica)

The black marlin (Makaira indica) is a species of marlin found in tropical and subtropical Indo-Pacific and east Pacific oceans from near the surface to depths of 915 m (3,002 ft).[2] It is a large commercial game fish with a maximum published length of 4.65 m (15.3 ft) and weight of 750 kg (1,700 lb).[2] It is one of the largest marlins and bony fish. This marlin is one of the fastest fish on earth reaching speeds up to 80 mph (130 km/h).[3] This fish is highly prized if caught.

 
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Blue Marlin

(Makaira mazara)

 

 

The strikingly beautiful blue marlin is the largest of the pacific marlins and one of the biggest fish in the world. Females, which are significantly larger than males, can reach 14 feet (4.3 meters) in length and weigh more than 1,985 pounds (900 kilograms). Average sizes tend to be in the range of 11 feet (3.4 meters) and 200 to 400 pounds (91 to 181 kilograms).

 

 
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Stripe Marlin

(Tetrapturus audax)

 

 

The striped marlin, Tetrapturus audax, is a small species of marlin found in tropical to temperate Indo-Pacific oceans not far from the surface. It is a desirable commercial and game fish with a record weight (in 1982) of 190 kg (420 lb) and a maximum length of 4.2 m (13.8 ft). The striped marlin is a predator that hunts during the day in the top 100 metres or so of the water column, often near the surface. One of their chief prey is sardines.

 

 
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Broadbill Sword Fish

(Xiphias gladius)

Swordfish (Xiphias gladius; from Greek ξίφος: sword, and Latin gladius: sword), also known as broadbill in some countries, are large, highly migratory, predatory fish characterized by a long, flat bill. They are a popular sport fish of the billfish category, though elusive. Swordfish are elongated, round-bodied, and lose all teeth and scales by adulthood. These fish are found widely in tropical and temperate parts of the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans, and can typically be found from near the surface to a depth of 550 m (1,800 ft).[2] They commonly reach 3 m (9.8 ft) in length, and the maximum reported is 4.55 m (14.9 ft) in length and 650 kg (1,400 lb) in weight

 

 

 

 

 
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YellowFin Tuna

(Thunnus albacares)

The yellowfin tuna is among the larger tuna species, reaching weights of over 400 pounds (180 kg), but is significantly smaller than the Atlantic and Pacific bluefin tunas, which can reach over 1,000 pounds (450 kg), and slightly smaller than the bigeye tuna and the southern bluefin tuna. The second dorsal fin and the anal fin, as well as the finlets between those fins and the tail, are bright yellow, giving this fish its common name. The second dorsal and anal fins can be very long in mature specimens, reaching almost as far back as the tail and giving the appearance of sickles or scimitars. The pectoral fins are also longer than the related bluefin tuna, but not as long as those of the albacore. The main body is very dark metallic blue, changing to silver on the belly, which has about 20 vertical lines.

 
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Southern Bluefin Tuna

(hunnus maccoyii)

The southern bluefin tuna, Thunnus maccoyii, is a tuna of the family Scombridae found in open southern hemisphere waters of all the world's oceans mainly between 30°S and 50°S, to nearly 60°S. At up to 2.5 m (8.2 ft) and weighing up to 400 kg (882 lbs) it is among the larger bony fishes.

The southern bluefin tuna is a large, streamlined, fast swimming fish with a long, slender caudal peduncle and relatively short dorsal, pectoral and anal fins. The body is completely covered in small scales.

The body color is blue-black on the back and silver-white on the flanks and belly, with bright yellow caudal keels in adult specimens. The first dorsal fin colour is grey with a yellow tinge, the second dorsal is red-brown, and the finlets are yellow with a darker border.

Southern bluefin tuna, like other pelagic tuna species, are part of a group of bony fishes that can maintain their body core temperature up to 10 degrees above the ambient temperature. This advantage enables them to maintain high metabolic output for predation and migrating large distances. The southern bluefin tuna is an opportunistic feeder, preying on a wide variety of fish, crustaceans, cephalopods, salps, and other marine animals

 

 
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Mako Shark

(Isurus)

Isurus is a genus of mackerel sharks in the family Lamnidae, commonly known as the mako sharks. There are two living species, the common shortfin mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus) and the rare longfin mako shark (Isurus paucus), and several extinct species known from fossils. They range in length from 2.5 to 4.5 metres (9 to 15 feet), and have an approximate maximum weight of 800 kg (1,750 lb). The family Lamnidae also includes sharks such as the great white shark and porbeagle. The mako shark is capable of swimming at speeds of up to 60 km/h, and jumping up to 7 metres (24 ft) in the air.

 

 

 

 

 
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'Species Information provided by Wikipedia'